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Season of Australian orange exports to China about to kick off

"Bleak finish for Egyptian orange import season"

China has entered the final week for the selection and packaging of late-season oranges. The 2017 orange production season has come to an end. At the same time, US oranges, Egyptian oranges, and Spanish oranges are all entering the final stage of their production seasons. The overall condition of the Chinese orange market during the last production season was depressed. The market condition was similarly disastrous for imported Egyptian oranges. Most importers suffered losses from the beginning of the production season until the very end. Only the quality of late-season Spanish oranges was relatively good and had some potential for profit.

Australia and South Africa have begun to select and package oranges for the upcoming, scorching hot Chinese summer. Mr. Xie Jinshan, CEO of the Shenzhen GoldAnda Agricultural Technology Development Co., Ltd. (hereafter GoldAnda) recently visited Nippys farms in Australia and the Gogo farms in South Africa. He stated that Australian orange production has slightly decreased this year, but the fruit size is slightly larger than last year. A larger share of the production volume meets the requirement for export to China. The taste and sweetness is also better than last year.

The production volume of South African oranges increased, but the fruit size is slightly smaller than last year. The area recently suffered from hail and other extreme weather conditions, but this only had limited influence on the overall production volume.

GoldAnda is a global leader in orange retail. They annually sell more than 1000 shipping containers full of oranges. GoldAnda has developed a strong cooperation with Australian Nippys in recent years. Together they have worked hard to make Nippys the number one Australian orange brand in China. At the same time, GoldAnda developed a good working relation with high-end South African brand Gogo. Their import volume has increased by 30%. Australian and South African oranges are already underway to Chinese ports and will soon arrive.

Xie Jinshan - CEO
GoldAnda
Shenzhen GoldAnda Agricultural Technology Development Co., Ltd.
Website: www.goldanda.com
Telephone number: +86 755 2515 4488
E-mail address: goldanda@goldanda.com

Publication date: 6/7/2018
Source: www.freshplaza.com

Vietnamese lychee hubs to start picking main crop

Lychee growers in the two lychee farming hubs of Vietnam (Bac Giang and Hai Duong provinces), are currently busy with harvesting this season's first crop of lychees. They are also preparing for picking the lychees of the fast-approaching main crop scheduled for the next five days.

By June 5, the lychee growing areas in the northern province of Bac Giang are entering the end of the early maturing fruit crop and are in preparation for harvesting the main crop. The province is expected to harvest 150,000-180,000 tons of lychees this season, the highest volume of the past few years. This is mainly due to the favourable climate and the acceleration of the application of technology in farming in accordance with VietGAP and GlobalGAP standards.

The quality and shape of the lychees are considered as the best in the past 10 years. The entire province of Bac Giang is estimated to sell approximately 9,000 tons of lychees by June 3, with a total value of $7.48 million.

Meanwhile, in the lychee farming hub of Hai Duong, Thanh Ha lychees are labelled with QR code stamps and all growing areas that meet the VietGAP and GlobalGAP standards will also be labelled with QR codes in order to trace the origins of the fruit. QR code labels are an essential requirement for Vietnamese lychees if they are to be exported to China through the Guangxi border in 2018.

According to the Hai Duong provincial Trade Promotion Centre, lychees tagged with QR codes are valued by consumers, particularly those in large cities and they are also at least 10% more expensive than those without a QR code.

According to en.nhandan.org.vn, the good news for lychee growers is that the Red Dragon Company successfully shipped 1.2 tons of early maturing lychees to Australia on March 28, which was the first batch of Hai Duong lychees to be exported to Australia. The company also plans to export more to Australia in addition to the EU and the Middle East.

Publication date: 6/7/2018

Source: www.freshplaza.com 

Mexican avocado producers seek to export to Australia and New Zealand

The Broad and Progressive Agreement of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), also known as the TPP-11, has allowed Mexican avocado producers to set their sights on the markets of Australia and New Zealand.

The two countries are important avocado producers in that region, but they have a very marked seasonal crop and, therefore, are complementary markets, said Ramon Paz Vega, the strategic adviser of the Association of Producers and Packers Exporters of Avocado in Mexico (APEAM).

Given this situation, and coupled with the growing demand in both nations, Mexico could take advantage of this opportunity and export its avocados to these markets when they lack local production, Paz Vega stated in an interview with Notimex.

Even though its difficult to enter these two markets because of the strict phytosanitary measures they have, Mexico has already started some negotiations in order to enter them.

For the moment, Mexico will continue exporting its avocados to Japan, where 95 percent of the avocado is imported from Mexico, which doesn't have any tariffs or any other barrier for this product there, he said.

Singapore is also an attractive market for Mexican avocados and producers expect to send at least four thousand tons of avocados there at the end of the harvest season, i.e. on June 30, he said.

Paz Vega also said this year's production would amount to just over two million tons, i.e. 10 percent more than the previous year. 835 thousand tons of the production will be sent to the United States, the main export market of the Mexican product.

The CPTPP represents a market of 372 million potential consumers and representatives of the 11 countries of the Asia-Pacific region - Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam - signed the agreement on March 8.

This established the largest free trade area in the world, with modern disciplines that meet the challenges of 21st century economies.

According to the Ministry of Economy (SE), Mexico will obtain significant and immediate access to 90 percent of the block's market. This will allow it to diversify its economy by opening preferential access to six new markets -Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and Vietnam - and deepen its access to the Japanese agricultural market.


Source: Notimex via www.freshplaza.com 

Publication date: 6/6/2018

'It's like a licence to print money' — Citrus industry urges Government to help preserve China trade

The citrus industry has called on the Federal Government to not "trip up" their trade with China, as Australian orange and mandarin growers enjoy the best prices in years.
Citrus Australia chief executive Nathan Hancock said the industry was experiencing boom times, with growers getting twice to three times as much for their fruit as they were five years ago.

The citrus harvest started in early May and this season demand is expected to outstrip supply, largely due to increasing exports to China.

China accounted for almost a quarter of the total 273,000 tonnes of citrus fruit exported last year.

"In 2013 we were close to zero export tonnes to China … In 2017, we exceeded 70,000 tonnes to China," Mr Hancock said.

But Mr Hancock was concerned about the fragility of the current world order, and Australia's relationship with our most lucrative trading partner.

"I'm not the only one in industry who is nervous about that," Mr Hancock said.

"We can't do anything much about those political machinations except to say to our government we don't want them tripping things up."

Mr Hancock said the industry's peak body, Citrus Australia, along with growers and packers had put "a lot of work" into supplying China's needs.

'It's like a licence to print money'
The on-farm protocols the Chinese government demanded, primarily to prevent pests and diseases, had been difficult to enact but the hard work has paid off.

Of the 25,000 hectares of citrus trees planted across the growing regions of Queensland, the Northern Territory, New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia, 9,200 hectares have been registered for export to China.

Second generation fruit grower John Hederics at Trentham, near Mildura, said one variety of pink-fleshed navel orange was particularly popular.

"It's like a licence to print money," he said.

The pink navel, which looks like any other orange from the outside, can fetch as much as $1,300 a tonne, Mr Hederics said.

"China's been a big change for us in the last four years with that market opening up and the demand for our fruit, they really love our fruit, especially the pink navels," he said.

"The Australian dollar has been good to us the last couple of years, it has really made a difference to the profitability of us growing citrus and exporting it."

Close view of a man's hands holding hald a pink navel orange, with a knife sliding into a section of fruit
PHOTO: Grower John Hederics says pink navels can fetch as much as $1,300 a tonne. (ABC News: Prue Adams)
Mr Hederics grows 130 hectares of citrus on his property adjacent to the Murray River, and he is clearing more land to expand the orchards to 350 hectares over the next three years; he wants to increase his production of seedless mandarins and pink-fleshed navels.

"It's a big investment," he said.

"You can't just plant a tree and harvest it next year — you've got to wait five to seven years to come into full production, so it's a real gamble guessing the varieties and what you should be doing."

Mr Hederics is one of the Mildura Fruit Company's (MFC) 130 contracted growers.

MFC is the country's biggest single supplier to the China market — accounting for about one third of the overall citrus trade.

MFC general manager Perry Hill said the Mildura-based packing plant first shipped fruit to China in 2011, after the export trade to the United States collapsed.

"Going back ten or more years ago, the biggest market for the premium grade fruit was the US," Mr Hill said.

"That diminished because of the likes of South Africa and Chile pushing a lot of fruit into that market, so all of a sudden we couldn't get the premium prices we were looking for, so we turned our mind elsewhere."

Source: http://www.abc.net.au

Author: Prue Adams

Northwest cherry harvest kicks off

The region has been spared by heavy winter damage and is looking likely to meet its 23m-carton estimate
The Northwest cherry industry is looking well positioned to meet its crop estimate of 23m cartons.

Last Friday, harvest was predicted to kick off over the following few days and will be easing into full swing this week. It will take the industry around two weeks to begin reaching the 200,000 carton-a-day mark.

Following a growers meeting in May which collected predicted yield data, industry volunteers have gathered on-the-ground orchard data for an official crop estimate.

The estimate came in at 23m 20lb (9kg) cartons, after a series of four estimates covering nearly three-quarters of the industry’s orchards.

Field reports have come back with instances of fewer flowers per bud, which would typically translate into larger and better fruit as the tree’s growing energy is distributed into fewer cherries. The Northwest Cherry Growers Association noted that the larger fruit will impact total production and overall shipping velocities by region and variety.

Despite a low yielding season for the California cherry crop, the Northwest was spared heavy winter damage.

In the month of June, the association predicts 9m cartons of cherries will be shipped out, ahead of last year’s 7.7m. The Yakima Valley has warmed up early this year, meaning there will be four Northwest regions shipping simultaneously.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Camellia Aebischer

Produce in firing line as US sparks trade war

The EU, Canada and Mexico consider retaliatory measures in response to US tariffs on steel and aluminium imports
The US has announced the imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the EU, Canada and Mexico, prompting fears of a protracted and damaging trade war.

Almost immediately after president Donald Trump’s announcement, the Mexican government issued a statement announcing that it would impose equivalent measures on various US imports including apples, table grapes and cranberries.

The measures would remain in effect until the US government eliminated the import tariffs, the Ministry for the Economy said.

The latest trade data available from ITC suggests that, of the three products, the US apple export trade would stand to lose the most from a Mexican tariff hike.

Mexico is by far the largest importer of US apples, with sales worth US$276.5m last year, compared with US$174.3m in Canada and US$97.4m in India.

Mark Powers, president of the Yakima, Washington-based Northwest Horticultural Council, said the move was expected to cause substantial damage to the industry.

Mexico is the third major market to impose tariffs on Washington apples as a result of US trade policy on steel and aluminium this year.

Last week, India announced plans to put a 30 per cent retaliatory tariff on US apples – on top of the 50 per cent tariff that they are already subjected to, while in China US fruit imports have faced a 15 per cent hike in tariffs since 2 April.

Sales of US fresh apples to Mexico may have declined slightly in recent years, but last year they were 21 per cent up on the previous campaign.

Meanwhile, fresh cranberry exporters in the US have seen the value of their business in Mexico increase considerably over the past few years, albeit from a low starting point. According to ITC, Mexican import sales rose by 30 per cent to just under US$1.27m between 2013 and 2017.

As for table grapes, the value of US sales to Mexico fell by 2 per cent to US$97.2m during 2013-2017, although ITC noted a 26 per cent increase in 2017 compared with the previous campaign.

WTO case opened

The EU, meanwhile, has confirmed it is opening a case at the World Trade Organisation in response to the new US duties, with EU trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström expected to announce retaliatory "proportionate" tariffs on US exports including cranberries "in accordance with WTO rules".

Federica Mogherini, the EU high representative on foreign policy, told journalists: "The European Union will today proceed with the WTO dispute settlement case adding those additional duties on a number of imports from the United States. The European Union measures will be reasonable, proportionate and in full compliance with WTO rules and obligations.”

The decision by the White House was dubbed “patently absurd” by the UK’s international trade secretary, Liam Fox, who suggested the UK would be prepared for “tit-for-tat” moves. “We absolutely do not rule out counter measures,” he asserted.

When the initial threat of tariffs was raised by the US back in March, the EU pledged to retaliate with tariffs on American imports such as orange juice, cranberries and bourbon.

“Logically, these unilateral measures on steel and aluminium will lead to multiple counter reactions around the world, and for sure they will be challenged within the WTO,” said Philippe Binard, general delegate of European fresh produce association Freshfel Europe.

“The EU has already published a list of potential retaliatory measures that will be effective from 18 June, including on orange juice, cranberry juice and sweet corn. Elsewhere in the world, retaliatory measures may include increased taxes on US fresh fruit and vegetables.”

The question, according to Binard, is whether or not the US will remove its measures on steel and aluminium in order to avoid triggering such a response.

Additional reporting by Mike Knowles and Maura Maxwell

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Tom Joyce

WA Avocado growers looking forward to developing market in Japan

A Western Australian avocado packer has welcomed new market access to Japan, saying it will be needed to help ensure growers get a good price for their produce into the future.

Last week, the Australian government reached a new protocol agreement for Hass avocados with Japan, and will be calling for applications for accreditation for growers in the coming weeks. Managing Director of Karri Country Produce, Jennie Franceschi, says at the current rate of industry expansion producers will need new markets like this to develop, with a major increase in volume forecast for coming years.

"It's a positive step as there are a lot of trees in the ground and production in Australia is going to be increasing significantly," she said. "So the figures I have been given by industry, there are 30 per cent of trees not producing and 20 per cent of trees that are producing, but not in full production. So that means half the trees in the ground are either not producing or under producing. I always think it's important to have many market distribution channels."

She praised the Australian Government for getting this access, saying the more supply channels available means more diversity and therefore more stability. Ms Franceschi adds that prices are "not exciting" for growers at the moment due to the amount of fruit on the market.

"The industry as a whole is under a bit of pressure at the moment," Ms Franceschi said. "We haven't seen these sort of returns in around five years. I think it's just getting people to eat them. There have been some very good sales, but it just hasn't encouraged more people to buy. So it's not really price, and I am not sure why people are not buying. There are good volumes around and very good quality. So, if you look at the current pricing in Australia, we will be very effective up there (in Japan)."

Initially the opportunity will only be available to fruit fly free areas, such as Western Australia, Riverland (South Australia) and Tasmania, and Ms Franceschi admits there may not be huge number of volumes at first, as growers get an understanding of the market.

"I don't think there will be huge quantities, but I will definitely be putting some fruit up there," she said. "Just to understand the lay of the land, as I think that's important to do that and learn. I have worked with the Japanese lately and I have found them to be honourable. They are hard, like you've got to go through a process, but they are very honourable. So I think it's very promising."

Among Australia's advantages is the proximity to Asia, meaning the fruit can get to market fairly quickly as well as Australia's clean and green image. This has put the produce high on the list for many Asian countries, according to Ms Franceschi, who conducted her own taste testing while recently in Malaysia.

"They had some fruit from other countries, as well as fruit from Australia - not Western Australian, but East Coast fruit," Ms Franceschi said. "We bought some from other countries, because we wanted to understand why our fruit was retailing for more, which was quite a premium over these other countries. I wanted to see if there was a legitimate reason for this. But when we cut the fruit there wasn't a very good seed in one, and the flavour wasn't the same. So everyone who tried it, all picked the Aussie avocado as being of a superior flavour and there was also more flesh."

The Hass season is underway in the east but the west is still a few months away. The last estimates put the Western Australian crop at a similar level as last season, but with winter to get through, those numbers are expected to firm up at a later date.

For more information:
Jennie Franceschi
Karri Country Produce
Phone: +61 8 9777 2246
Publication date: 5/31/2018
Author: Matthew Russell
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com

Australian mango production hit record in 2017-18

The Australian mango industry achieved record volumes during the previous campaign and is set to see volumes continue to rise given the large number of trees being planted, ABC News reported.

The 2017-18 season saw over 10 million trays picked for the first time, with the Northern Territory and Queensland producing 48% and 47% of the national volumes respectively.

An increasing number of new mango trees maturing into commercial production was the main driver behind the record harvest, ABC reported.

Australian Mangoes CEO Robert Gray said newer mango varieties were making up an increasingly larger share of the national crop.

“The non-Kensington Pride varieties are really starting to be a much bigger contributor as those orchards that have been planted over the last 10 to 15 years start getting into full production,” Gray was quoted as saying.

“This is probably the first year that the combination of R2E2, Honey Gold, Calypso and Keitt contributed more than 50 per cent of the total production.”

He added that although volumes may fluctuate, total production is expected to rise over the next five years.

While both early and late season mangoes received good prices, an oversupply mid-season pushed prices down for some regions, he said.

Source: ww.freshfruitportal.com

The Budget is released and details begin to emerge

The Australian Federal Budget for the 2018/2019 year was announced in Parliament on 8 May 2018. Individual summaries for portfolios can be found at the relevant websites for the portfolio agencies.

The following issues were announced which may have an impact for those in the customs and trade industry. I had deferred any commentary until more detail came to light on some of the issues.

Biosecurity Import Levy
As I suggested shortly before the Budget was announced, there is a proposal for a new levy on imports by sea to cover an ‘enhanced biosecurity system’. The levy is estimated to raise $325M over the three financial years from 2019 – 20, an average of $108M each year.

The levy is intended to start from 1 July 2019 and would be:

  • introduced on sea containers and non-containerised imports by sea (not on airfreight);
  • introduced on port terminal operators for goods that are unloaded and cleared under the Biosecurity Act;
  • set at $10.02 per incoming twenty-foot equivalent sea container and $1 per tonne for non-containerised cargo; and
  • 1% of the current cost of importing a container.

 

Of interest is that the levy is being imposed on port terminal operators. Presumably it will be passed on down the supply chain to shipping lines, then to freight forwarders and then to importers. However a real issue arises from the way it will be imposed and whether each party will add an administrative or other charge at each stage.

Also of interest are the revelations that the additional charge is not for cost recovery of existing biosecurity reviews but is a levy apparently to be ‘set aside’. Readers would be aware that existing processing charges on full import declarations already include a portion for biosecurity review. It would appear that the levy is intended to cover contingencies against future events which may require a significant response, such as another prawn ‘white spot’ infestation. Being characterised as a ‘levy’ also means it falls outside of the regime established by the Department of Finance Cost Recovery Guidelines which would require prior consultation with details to be provided. It could also mean that those liable to the levy could recover it against all containers moved, including empty containers or those there for export. Accordingly, we are all keen to hear the additional services to be provided and how this levy will be charged and imposed.

Aviation security
The budget provides for $293.63M allocated over 4 years to strengthen air cargo and international mail security. In addition $121M will be going to increase inbound cargo screening and $122M towards increasing ABF and AFP officers at airports.

On a domestic level, the additional budget allowance will increase security screening at certain regional airports and allow for the installation of new x-ray and personal screening equipment. Police at airports will be granted additional powers, including requiring passengers to prove their identity.

A significant 'non-budget' development is confirmation that the 'piece-level' scanning procedures adopted for exports to the US are now to be adopted for all goods for export by air. This is to be implemented by 1 March 2019 and poses a challenge for all in the supply chain.

Single Window for Trade
The Budget included a promise of $10.5M to ‘transform and modernise’ the supply chain by completing the business case for a ‘single window’ for international trade documentation. Not the single window itself but merely the business case as to its likely costs and benefits. This was first promised as part of an election commitment in 2016 and is moving very slowly. By comparison, NZ’s ‘Trade Single Window’ (or TSW) commences on 1 July this year!

Australian Trusted Trader Programme (ATTP)
There is a non-specific statement in the Budget to the effect that those in the ATTP would not be required to produce a Country of Origin (COO) document for goods imported under ‘certain’ FTAs. However, those FTAs were not identified nor was the process by which preferential status would be able to be claimed. It could be difficult to implement in FTAs where COOs are compulsory such as ChAFTA, as the FTAs themselves may need amendment. There has since been confirmation that the funding is only for a first step to consider where the arrangements could be implemented. This is in response to industry requests.

SME export hubs and other trade-related matters
The Budget contained some other promises of funding to assist SME operators to more comprehensively engage in trade and take the benefit of FTAs which have been negotiated and which are being negotiated:

$20M (over four years) towards funding ‘Industry Growth Centres’ for two more years as well as an ‘SME export hubs program’. The details have yet to be provided, but it would appear to be a grant program that will enable a group of SMEs in a region to get funding for activities to benefit them as a group, such as brand development, enhancing supply chains and upskilling
$15M to DFAT to boost ‘economic diplomacy’ to include continuing and expanding the FTA outreach program as well as engaging more with business including provision of economic and security insights
a small boost for Austrade including $3.2M to develop a new national brand
investments in freight and rail infrastructure including $400M for a new rail line at Port Botany
$51.3M over four years to grow agricultural exports
additional agricultural counsellors in key export markets

 

Read more . . . 

Source: http://www.rigbycooke.com.au

Australian stone fruit producers taking advantage of new improved Chinese protocols

New protocols, and an improved growing season has helped the imports of Australian stone fruit into the Chinese supply chain increase 167 per cent in volume, compared to last year.

Summerfruit Australia says the figures, as of March 2018, recognise the addition of peaches and plums for the first time, after the industry gained access for all categories of stone fruit from November 2017, adding to nectarines, which started supply the year prior.

"Due to our protocol conditions and current limitations, our industry quickly seized on the new access for peaches and plums," CEO of Summerfruit Australia John Moore said. "Apricots are a very delicate fruit and will need more protocol improvements to successfully deliver first class quality to Chinese consumers. With nectarines in the second year of access, there was a significant increase in exports due to a much improved growing season over 2016/17."

He adds that the late announcement in 2017 for access of peaches, plums and apricots was very much welcomed, by both Australian producers and Chinese customers.

"Detailed surveillance of the key Chinese markets - Guangzhou, Shanghai and Beijing - heard positive feedback of quality, price points and consumer satisfaction for eating quality across the spectrum of nectarines, both yellow and white flesh; peaches both yellow and white flesh; and the spectrum of plums, inclusive of sugar plums," Mr Moore said. "The Australian Summerfruit sent to China this season re-established our distinguishing quality factor, eating characteristics and freshness over southern competitors.”

Summerfruit Australia's General Manager for Intellectual Property and Business Development Rowan Little says overall the season was an improvement in terms of timing and fruit quality on the year prior. Early fruit was almost two weeks earlier than the year prior which proved a good introduction into the season.

"I think the general consensus was that peaches were in heavy supply which resulted in some low grower returns," Mr Little said. "Nectarines were in good supply but not in over production. Plums were a little lighter than the previous season while Apricots returns were overall slightly lower."

The main challenge from a quality perspective was early season frosts in most districts and a few hail events which primarily affected the Cobram district. Other than that a few rain events had impacts at various times but overall the summer growing season was good.

However, Mr Little says domestic demand was relatively flat, but flavour and fruit size remain the primary drivers of domestic consumer demand.

"Nectarines continue to dominate the Australian domestic market in terms of volume of sales," he said. "In this space, yellow nectarines are also preferred over white. Sales were strongest for nectarines through January. During this period demand off shore for large white nectarines was also strong though grower returns were only average. Nectarines performed much better in China than the year prior with better fruit flavour driving demand and increased volume. Formal access for Plums and Peaches was not granted until mid-season, but with the benefit of a full season of access in 2018/19 this situation is expected to improve."

For more information:
Summerfruit Australia
Phone: +61 2 6041 6641
ceo@summerfruit.com.au
www.summerfruit.com.au

Publication date: 5/28/2018
Author: Matthew Russell
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com

Potential Australia-Europe FTA

The Council of the European Union has agreed to talk with Australia about forming a free trade agreement
In the coming weeks, discussions for a free trade agreement between Australia and the European Union (EU) will commence.

Horticultural products are in the mix of potential exports, and a proposed agricultural counsellor strategically placed in the EU will help secure and improve market access for Australian producers.

“This has big potential for our farmers and will open up lucrative premium markets in our fourth largest export destination driving increased exports, economic growth and jobs in rural and regional Australia,” said Australian minister for agriculture and water resources, David Littleproud.

“So much of the food our famers produce goes to export and the government will be working hard to make sure our farmers get real benefits from this.”

As part of this year’s budget in Australia, the federal government has announced the appointment of an agricultural counsellor in the EU who will work on market access deals on the ground.

“The EU is our fourth largest export destination for agriculture, fisheries and forestry worth $3.8 billion in 2016-17. It is also our largest source of agriculture, fisheries and forestry imports, valued at $5.6 billion,” Littleproud said.

“I look forward to the launch of negotiations between Australia and the European Union next month in Australia to further cement our important trade relationship with the EU.”

 

Australian Hass to Japan approved for access

Hass avocados from Australia can now be officially exported to Japan from fruitfly-free regions
On May 23, Australia’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources officially declared export access to Japan for Hass avocados.

The avocados must be grown in specific zones, meet the “hard mature” condition, and be sent from Department of Agriculture accredited packhouses and growers.

The source regions are strictly limited to officially recognised areas free from Queensland fruit fly: Western Australia, Riverland (South Australia) and Tasmania.

The Department of Agriculture confirmed with Asiafruit that there is no cold treatment protocol as part of the access.

In the coming weeks the department will release an official call for applications for accreditation.

 

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Camellia Aebischer